The Room

The Room is the worst film ever made. You already know if you want to see it.

It isn’t about the movie – it’s about the audience.

Tommy Wiseau wrote, directed, produced and starred in this 2003 film about Johnny, a bank executive inexplicably engaged to the personification of all evil, Lisa. (You can’t help but wonder who broke Wiseau’s heart and caused this travesty of a film to be made.) Recently one of the stars of the film, Greg Sestero, published the book The Disaster Artist about his experiences working on the movie and the reality seems to have been as disastrous as it looked.

There’s a perverse joy to be found in any watching of The Room’s most famous scenes – the timing, poor scripting and strange pseudo-symbolic moments lend themselves to ridicule. However, there’s a big difference between watching it in your living room and watching it at the Assembly George Square Theatre. Here every viewer’s wry asides become backchat bellowed at Tommy Wiseau’s perpetually strange face. It’s the 21st century’s version of ‘Oh no you didn’t’, with a fittingly modern sense of irony. Even repeat attendees can expect to come away with a new joke beyond the well-known cries of ‘Spoons’, ‘Meanwhile in San Francisco’ and ‘Because you’re a woman!’

As a Fringe show, it isn’t about the movie – it’s about the audience. Word seems to have spread about the cult classic, because the theatre was packed the night I attended with my own group of friends. It’s a fantastic group outing, combining entertainment, drink and throwing spoons with reckless abandon. I’d recommend reading up on traditions before attending; while it’s not quite as complex as The Rocky Horror Picture Show there are a couple of things you’ll want to keep in mind.

Don’t go alone. Don’t go sober. But go. 

Reviews by Frankie Goodway

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Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Performances

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The Blurb

Bring your plastic spoons and enjoy a Sunday night screening of the cult phenomenon that is The Room. 'The awful movie everyone wants to see' (Time Magazine). 'This has truly been the highlight of my Fringe' (Chortle.co.uk).

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