The Jennifer Tremblay Trilogy Part III: The Deliverance

Attempting to answer the question posed in the second part – The Carousel ­– of whether The Woman had a ‘happy childhood’ or not, The Deliverance provides the conclusion to The Jennifer Tremblay Trilogy. As her mother dies, The Woman is forced to return to her adolescence, one of violence and confusion, her current familial situation brought to the forefront of her mind. The Woman’s attempt to grapple with the death of her mother is made harder by her half-brother’s unwillingness to come and see his mother before she dies.

Tremblay’s writing remains poetic and powerful both in terms of the form and language used.

Maureen Beattie continues to play the central character with great power, her control over the language of the play ensuring that, in spite of the denseness of both language and ideas, main narrative thread is clear throughout the play.

Tremblay’s writing remains poetic and powerful both in terms of the form and language used. The structure of the play is such that the memory of The Woman’s bullying, violent step-father – filled with hatred for both his new wife and children – sits heavy over the play, a constant reminder of the ongoing effects of adolescence. It is at points slightly heavy-handed in its poetry and reliance on overhanging memories, but the non-linear structure of the play generally facilitates The Woman’s story effectively.

As in the other parts the set (John Byrne), sound (Philip Pinsky), and lighting (Jeanine Byrne) are each accomplished and facilitate the wide and sweeping range of locations and time periods in the play. The transformation of the theatre into a High Church, complete with hundreds of flickering candles, ensures The Deliverance has a sense of stillness and attempted closure throughout.

With The Deliverance providing a fitting conclusion to an accomplished piece of writing, the Trilogy is never easy or simple theatre to watch, but it is exciting and compelling in terms of both writing and performance.

Reviews by Joanna Bowman

Summerhall

I Gave Him an Orchid

★★★
Summerhall

Gods Are Fallen And All Safety Gone

★★★★
Traverse Theatre

Tomorrow

★★★★
Traverse Theatre

Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour

★★★★

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The Blurb

The highly anticipated premiere of the final instalment of Tremblay's double Scotsman Fringe First Award-winning trilogy. Each play is a story in its own right, but together they form a powerful piece of theatre. A woman struggles to fulfil her dying mother's last wish: to see the son torn from her at a young age. She goes in search of him and the truth about their past. Will her journey end in redemption? Translated by Shelley Tepperman. Starring Maureen Beattie. Design by John Byrne. Part of Made in Scotland Showcase. www.madeinscotlandshowcase.com

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