How is Uncle John?

How Is Uncle John? is a story about the relationship of mother and daughter: of protector and protected, and of victim and survivor. Itis a brave depiction of domestic abuse and sex trafficking that follows the struggles of Hope and her mother against the abusive men in their lives. Hope’s Greek, family-man boyfriend dupes her into travelling to Italy with him where he sells her into the sex trade. Hope’s mother’s ridiculing husband grinds down her self worth.

A painful and chilling play about a very difficult topic, handled with the utmost care and sensitivity.

Both Holly Joyce, as the mother, and Naomi Stafford, as Hope, give stellar performances. Joyce plays the anxious, helpless and heartbroken mother beautifully. However, Stafford has the real challenge. Her naive, watery performance in the first half of the play somewhat surprisingly gives way to a moving and, at moments, graphic portrayal of sex trafficking towards the end. Her mother’s story is delivered in a conversational manner to begin with, placing us in the position of therapist. Hope’s story, however, sound more like a diary entry than speech at times as she gushes about her new boyfriend, before turning into vivid storytelling, flipping the tone on its head as events turn dark.

Sally Lewis’ script is nuanced and powerful. However, narratively speaking, sixty minutes simply doesn’t feel long enough for many of the themes to be fully explored, and the script can make presumptive jumps without allowing time for the narrative to develop. Revolving around Hope’s central story of sex trafficking are three parallel stories: two short accounts of when a mother felt powerless to save her young child, both with sexually implicated circumstances, and Hope’s mother’s own emotionally manipulative husband. Though these stories lend a depth to the guilt of Hope’s mother and the dangerous way in which men have played roles in both their lives, these disparate examples don’t feel substantial enough to bolster around the central theme of sex trafficking.

Director Ben Mills’ staging at times doesn’t help an already contrived narrative. However, it's mostly stripped back enough for performances to shine in a small venue. How Is Uncle John? is a painful and chilling play about a very difficult topic, handled with the utmost care and sensitivity.

Reviews by Ellie Coote

Paradise in Augustines

Penetrating Europe, or Migrants Have Talent

★★
Assembly Hall

How is Uncle John?

★★★
C venues - C

Playing Soldiers

★★
C venues - C

All Might Seem Good

★★★
Paradise in The Vault

Sheltered

★★★★
Liquid Room Annexe

Strictly Come Trancing

★★★

Since you’re here…

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You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Performances

Location

The Blurb

When Hope was young, her mother did everything she could to ensure her daughter was safe. As she grew more independent, Hope began to slip from her mother's fingers. Years later, Hope has fallen in love. When she goes on holiday with her new partner, a few days turn into months. At home, sick with worry, Hope's mother receives a telephone call. The remarkable story of a daughter trafficked into the sex market and her mother's journey to bring her home, this Fringe debut is an unflinching descent into darkness.

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