Britney

Witty, lively and often heartwarming, Britney is a hilarious and hugely watchable production. The show intersperses narration and sketch-like scenes as it tells the true story of two friends, Charly Clive and Ellen Robertson, as they react and come to terms with Charly being diagnosed with a brain tumour. It’s perhaps not the most intuitive topic for an hour of Fringe comedy, but it works wonderfully well, managing to be both effortlessly lighthearted and unremittingly funny.

At times the show takes a distinctly surreal turn, for example personifying the tumour as a community of angry, Welsh, communist miners staging a furious protest

Through a series of semi-fictionalised scenes and stories, some personal some ridiculous, Charly and Ellen tell the audience about their friendship, Charly’s diagnosis and treatment, and how the two of them coped with the situation.

The show has a well-polished, well-rehearsed feel to it which comes out as the two performers jump smoothly between an array of different and frequently absurd characters - an inappropriately jovial anaesthetist, a menacing Russian nurse, Charly’s parents, and each other, to name just a few. At times the show takes a distinctly surreal turn, for example personifying the tumour as a community of angry, Welsh, communist miners staging a furious protest. In one pleasantly ridiculous section, the doctor breaking the news of Charly’s tumour is re-imagined in different genres and film styles - first as a smokey, blue-lit film-noir, then as a scene from Harry Potter. It’s over the top, but works well with the fast-paced, sketch-like style of the production.

There are a couple of points in the show where the duo deftly allow the full weight of the subject matter to hit home to the audience, prompting poignant moments of pin-drop silence. This seriousness is used very sparingly, however, and executed with great skill so that the performers are usually able to restore the room to lively laughter moments later.

In no way held back by the gravity of its theme, this show is great fun and well-worth seeing. 

Reviews by Nuri Syed Corser

Summerhall

Green & Blue

★★★
Greenside @ Infirmary Street

Play Before Birth

★★★
ZOO Playground

Landscape (1989)

★★
Summerhall

Who Cares

★★★★
Summerhall

Like Animals

★★
CanadaHub @ King's Hall in association with Summerhall

Sea Sick

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

When good brains go bad. This is the very true and very funny story of two best friends coming to terms with one being diagnosed with a brain tumour. As told by a host of unlikely and occasionally fictional characters, the show is a comedy cum sketch show cum cabaret cum play cum one cum all cum to the show. Hopefully it's a reminder that sometimes laughter is the best medicine. (Ultimately the best medicine is the operation and please, if you have a brain tumour, seek urgent medical attention).

Most Popular See More

Come From Away

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Heathers The Musical

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Life of Pi

From £19.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets